Archive:

Month: June 2021


Future Faces: Jan Serfontein and Iain Henderson

first_img“My family are rugby-mad. Dad played rugby for Academy RFC in Belfast and I played there until I went to study at Queen’s University, Belfast.”Although a handy player as a youngster, it’s only in the past year that his career has been fast-tracked. “I was picked up for Ulster U20 and pretty soon that led to a national call-up, so I’m thrilled,” he says.Henderson was part of the Ireland U20 squad that this year secured their best-ever JWC finish of fifth, beating eventual winners South Africa in the pool stages. “We were chuffed with our Junior World Championship performances because you only get one shot at it. We really gelled and it showed in our performances.”Next up for Henderson is to break into the Ulster squad. “I want to get a look in the match-day squad. So far the likes of Chris Henry and David Drake, the Ulster Academy fitness coach, have kept an eye out for us and I’m loving every minute.”Rugby World Verdict: Henderson has already proved he has the ability for the big occasion. Owain JonesThis article appeared in the September 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ireland Under 20 Headshots 24/1/2012Christopher FarrellMandatory Credit ©INPHO/Cathal Noonan *** Local Caption *** Jan Serfontein(Blue Bulls)Jan SerfonteinIF THE perfect day existed in rugby, Springbok U20 centre Jan Serfontein went close to achieving it on 22 June. Not only did he win the Junior World Championship in front of 35,000 compatriots, but in the process he defeated rivals New Zealand 22-16 and touched down with the crucial score.It capped a superb campaign from the powerful inside-centre from Port Elizabeth, who succeeded George Ford in being voted IRB Junior Player of the Year. Serfontein, 19, is the first South African to win the award, and the first to receive an IRB age-grade honour since Pat Barnard was named the IRB U21 Player of the Year in 2002. Chatting to the amiable youngster, he is humility personified. “It was incredible to win the JWC and to score the winning try just topped the occasion off.”Schooled at the prestigious Grey College in Port Elizabeth, which has produced Bismarck du Plessis and Frans Steyn, Serfontein has had to get used to attention of his own.“I got noticed after winning the JWC but luckily I’m back at the Blue Bulls now, so no one is making a fuss, which is how I like it.” As for his first objective, it’s simply to make the Bulls squad. “I’m still young and I have Springboks Wynand Olivier and JJ Engelbrecht to contend with. I must be patient.”As an admirer of Sonny Bill Williams, he relishes being close to the action. “I like No 12 as I get my hands on the ball, but I’m not too bothered as long as I’m in the team.”Rugby World Verdict: Another stellar talent from the Grey College production line. Owain JonesIain Henderson(Ulster)Iain Henderson (inpho)IAIN HENDERSON made quite an impact on his Pro12 debut for Ulster in May. Early in the second half, receiving the ball in midfield and with quick feet that belied his 6ft 6in, 18st 1lb frame, he managed to evade four Munster defenders to stretch out and score in a manner Stephen Ferris would have been proud of.So where was the wild celebration from the Ireland U20 lock? “I was absolutely shattered, but that’s what it should be like if you’re giving your all.” Wise words coming from a 20-year-old but unsurprising given his rugby background. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170last_img read more

Scotland 32-26 France Talking Points from Murrayfield

first_imgFor the first, scored inside three minutes, he sprinted down the wing past Finn Russell and then cut inside to evade Stuart Hogg’s attempted tackle and touch down.Pure joy: Teddy Thomas celebrates his second try against Scotland. Photo: Getty ImagesThe second came when he kicked over Hogg, chased hard and as the ball bounced away from the retreating Greig Laidlaw it fell into Thomas’s path. He eagerly accepted the kind bounce of the ball and cantered over.He may not be the most solid of wings in defence but he certainly entertains with ball in hand. Expect more from him in this championship.Related: Who is Teddy Thomas?Wayward kicks At Twickenham yesterday, George Ford and Owen Farrell offered a masterclass in kicking out of hand. At Murrayfield we did not see the same. There was plenty of kicking, but much was not only inaccurate but it presented the opposition with chances.Related: England 12-6 Wales match reportFinn Russell is known for his speed of thought but sometimes he needs to take that second or two longer.He looked to send one first-half penalty deep into the French 22, took it quickly and sent it dead. Back they came for a France scrum close to halfway.On another occasion he kicked the ball straight out as he looked to gain territory and he missed touch with a penalty early in the second half too.On the whole both teams kicked too often to the opposition back three, giving them the possession and space to launch counter-attacks.Eyes on the prize: Stuart Hogg attacks the line for Scotland. Photo: Getty ImagesIn the second half it was interesting to see that Russell and Stuart Hogg opted to attack the line more often and this brought its own rewards in the penalties that Greig Laidlaw sent through the posts.Athletic FranceThe French are often criticised for not putting the same onus on fitness as other nations do. There have been tales of British and Irish players joining Top 14 clubs and being shocked by the lack of focus put into conditioning programmes.France No 8 Louis Picamoles even spoke about the improvements he made in terms of his fitness while at Northampton last season.Sebastien Vahaamahina looks to make ground against Scotland. Photo: Getty ImagesNow, though, there seems to be a new breed of athletic French forwards. The likes of Arthur Iturria, Sebastien Vahaamahina, Wenceslas Lauret and Yacouba Camara are comfortable in the loose as well as the tight – and add a different dimension when not simply used as carriers from close range. On target: Greig Laidlaw kicked 22 points against France. Photo: Getty Images Scotland – Tries: Maitland, Jones. Cons: Laidlaw 2. Pens: Laidlaw 6.France – Tries: Thomas 2. Cons: Machenaud 2. Pens: Machenaud 2, Serin 2. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Scotland 32-26 France Talking PointsThe boot of Greig Laidlaw guided Scotland to a memorable win over France at BT Murrayfield – only their third over Les Bleus since the tournament became the Six Nations.It was a nip-tuck affair, particularly in a frenetic first half that saw both sides show a lot of ambition in attack and score two tries apiece – Teddy Thomas with a brace for France, and Sean Maitland and Huw Jones crossing for Scotland.In the second half it all came down to the kicks – Baptiste Serin slotted two for France but Laidlaw was masterful as he continued to make the visitors pay for their infringements.It was a more balanced performance from Scotland than in last week’s defeat by Wales, although they will most likely need to improve further if they are to beat England in the Calcutta Cup in a fortnight.Here are the big talking points from the game…Laidlaw punishes French ill-disciplineFrance gave away far too many kickable penalties in the second half. Greig Laidlaw slotted six penalties in the second 40 to put Scotland in front as Les Bleus were continually penalised in their own 22.LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION OFFERSLaidlaw may not be considered as exciting a player as Ali Price, but his accuracy from the tee came to the fore and closed out a memorable win.Captain John Barclay highlighted afterwards how Scotland’s ability to play at tempo in that second period, forced the errors from France as the visitors couldn’t continually defend legally at the breakdown.Those teams yet to play France will pay close attention to the visitors’ penalty count. When Scotland put the pressure on in the French half, the players in blue were regularly pinged by John Lacey. In all they conceded 13 penalties to Scotland’s ten – but it was the position in which they conceded those penalties, deep in their own half, that proved decisive.France will need to improve their discipline – and particularly where they concede penalties – if they are to win games in this championship.Direct lineA problem area for Scotland recently has been their lack of powerful ball-carriers to get across the gain-line.In Wales last week they were criticised for going wide before going forward. Here there was a change in approach. Yes, they were still looking to go wide but they also had players looking to make yards through the middle.Grant Gilchrist was promoted from the bench to the starting line-up for this match and his red headguard regularly popped up as Scotland used carriers off rucks to gain those extra metres. The three starting front-rowers were also used effectively in this facet, particularly Simon Berghan, who made 12 carries. The Scots as a team achieved more penetration than they had in Cardiff.Fine line: Huw Jones dives over for Scotland’s second try. Photo: Getty ImagesThe best line of all came from Huw Jones in the 32nd minute. After the likes of Gilchrist had made ground into the French 22, Greig Laidlaw fed the ball to Jones and the outside-centre timed his run to perfection to cut between two French defenders on the angle.Teddy flairTeddy Thomas scored a fantastic try against Ireland last week and bettered that by crossing twice in the first half-hour here. What you need to know about Scotland’s 32-26 win over France in the Six Nationslast_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: Bobby Windsor

first_imgThey don’t make ’em like Bobby Windsor these days. The Welsh hooker played rugby with an unrivalled ferocity, a trait that thrust him into the game’s highest bracket TAGS: The Greatest Players At school in Newport, Windsor once scored 56 goals in a season. He took that skill and pace with him to the rugby field, scoring a try on his Wales debut against Australia in his breakthrough campaign, 1973-74.Over the next five-and-a-half years, he was to earn 28 successive Welsh caps and become a double Lion and double Grand Slammer.Viet Gwent: the legendary Wales front row of Graham Price, Bobby Windsor and Charlie Faulkner (Getty)His club feats were no less notable, Windsor packing down between Graham Price and Charlie Faulkner in the famous ‘Viet Gwent’ Pontypool front row that shared many a triumph on the international stage. The trio played together for Wales 19 times and also for the Lions in Fiji on 16 August 1977 (the day that Elvis died). Major teams: Cross Keys, Cardiff, Pontypool Country: WalesTest span: 1973-79Wales caps: 28 (28 starts)Lions caps: 5 (5 starts)Test points: 4 (1T)Rugby’s Greatest: Bobby WindsorHe says he was always hungry as a kid and hooker Bobby Windsor played his rugby with that same ferocious appetite for Wales and the Lions during a golden age for both teams.At 16st-plus, he was built like a prop at a time of light hookers, and on the 1974 Lions tour of South Africa he proved he was one of the great scrummaging front-rowers. The Lions would take the Boks so low in the scrum that Windsor would sometimes hook with his head before driving over them, there being no law then about keeping shoulders above the hips.As able to take a punch as deliver one, hence his ‘Iron Duke’ nickname, Windsor was made for that tour because of his abrasiveness and love of the fight.Eddie Butler, his team-mate at Pontypool, calls him the best he ever played with. “Some hookers are good at some parts of their trade and not so good at others. Bobby was a master of them all,” said the former Wales No 8. “He was also vicious, the most cold-hearted brute you would never wish to see standing over you at a ruck.” Blood and thunder: Bobby Windsor kicks upfield against Bay of Plenty during the 1977 Lions tour (Getty) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Advised to retire in 1980 because of a back injury, Windsor played for another seven years, until the age of 41. Legendary coach Ray Prosser hailed him as the only tight forward he’s seen who could change the course of a game. Wales have never seen his like again.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

La Comisión de Liturgia da a conocer una propuesta sobre…

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 12, 2012 Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA [Episcopal News Service] La Comisión Permanente sobre Liturgia y Música (SCLM, por su sigla en inglés) de la Iglesia Episcopal ha dado a conocer fragmentos de su informe: “Yo te bendeciré y tú serás una bendición: materiales para la bendición de personas del mismo sexo”, que incluye el texto del rito de bendición que proponen.Los pasajes del informe de la comisión a la Convención General pueden consultarse en la Internet aquí en la sección de Documentos.Además del rito propuesto, los fragmentos dados a conocer el 8 de marzo incluyen una reflexión teológica sobre la bendición de relaciones del mismo sexo y dos resoluciones legislativas relacionadas con el asunto que la Comisión de Liturgia recomendará a la Convención General cuando ésta se reúna en Indianápolis del 4 al 12 de julio.“Realmente queremos darle a los obispos y a los diputados en particular una oportunidad de entender el material antes de la Convención General, y proporcionándoselo a la Iglesia en general le permitirá a los obispos y diputados escuchar a toda la Iglesia como parte de su discernimiento respecto a cómo podrían responder a la Convención”, dijo la Rda. Ruth Meyers -profesora de la cátedra Hodges-Haynes de liturgia en la Escuela de Teología Eclesial del Pacífico y presidenta de la Comisión Permanente de Liturgia y Música- a Episcopal News Service en una entrevista telefónica poco antes de que publicaran los pasajes.El trabajo de la SCLM se produce en respuesta al mandato de la Convención General de 2009 (vía Resolución C056) que colabora con la Cámara de Obispos para hacer acopio de materiales teológicos y liturgias para bendiciones de relaciones del mismo sexo y presentar un informe al respecto a la 77ª. reunión de la Convención este verano.El rito propuesto se titula “El testimonio y la bendición de un pacto de por vida”. El matrimonio no se menciona específicamente porque, como Meyers ha señalado frecuentemente, la C056 ha pedido la creación de materiales para la bendición de relaciones del mismo sexo y no para solemnizar matrimonios de parejas del mismo sexo. Sin embargo, la página introductoria del rito advierte que “para cumplir con las leyes de la jurisdicción civil en la cual el rito se celebra, el sacerdote debe consultarle al obispo, que puede autorizar modificaciones en [la sección] del pronunciamiento” del rito.Meyers dijo a ENS que la comisión quería “dejar libertad de acción” a los obispos en tales escenarios que ya hayan decidido o tengan que decidir qué clérigos de sus diócesis puedan oficiar en la parte religiosa de un matrimonio o unión civil. Agregó que tal decisión puede necesitar un cambio en las palabras de la parte de la liturgia en la cual el que preside dice: “Puesto que N. y N. han intercambiado promesas de amor y fidelidad en presencia de Dios y de la Iglesia, yo declaro ahora que ellos están vinculados mutuamente en un santo pacto, por todo el tiempo en que ambos vivieren. Amén”.El rito, que se espera tenga lugar dentro del contexto de la Santa Eucaristía, se sugiere que incluya una extensión de la aclamación de apertura, una exhortación (que tradicionalmente comienza “Muy amados:”), específica de la naturaleza del rito; cuatro nuevas colectas que se sugieren; listas de lecciones del Antiguo Testamento y de la Epístola, así como de lecturas de los Salmos y del Evangelio que resulten adecuadas; un nuevo prefacio a la plegaria eucarística y una nueva oración de postcomunión.La sección de  “atestiguación de los votos y bendición del pacto” incluye adiciones recién escritas a una estructura y elementos que se hacen eco del rito de matrimonio del Libro de Oración Común.Meyers le dijo a ENS que el equipo de trabajo litúrgico de la Comisión había recibido “centenares” de ritos de bendición, algunos de los cuales se remontaban a la década del 70, enviados por episcopales en respuesta a una solicitud de la SCLM. Basándose en una serie de principios litúrgicos y teológicos para la revisión de los ritos, [los miembros de este equipo de la Comisión] leyeron cada uno de [los ritos que les enviaron] y tomaron elementos de algunos de ellos, explicó. Una muestra de los ritos se encuentra aquí.Un comunicado de prensa de la Oficina de Relaciones Públicas de la Iglesia decía que la reflexión teológica resaltaba que la SCLM ha revisado más de 30 años de deliberaciones de la Convención General sobre parejas del mismo sexo, especialmente la resolución D039 de 2000, que identificaba las características que la Iglesia espera de parejas que viven en matrimonio y en otras relaciones comprometidas de por vida: “fidelidad, monogamia, afecto y respeto mutuos, comunicación amable y sincera, y el santo amor que permite a los que participan en tales relaciones de ver en el otro la imagen de Dios”.La primera resolución de la SCLM le pide a la Convención que encomiende su informe a la iglesia para su estudio y que permita el uso experimental del rito litúrgico a partir del primer domingo de Adviento de 2012 (2 de diciembre). El período de uso experimental que se propone permitiría una revisión de parte de toda la Iglesia y la SCLM informaría a la siguiente reunión de la Convención General que sesionará en Salt Lake City en 2015 sobre el modo en que se usaron todos los materiales.Esa resolución también  solicita que la Convención extienda la cláusula de la C056 de “generosa respuesta pastoral”, particularmente a los obispos en diócesis dentro de las jurisdicciones civiles donde los matrimonios, las uniones civiles o las llamadas asociaciones domésticas de personas del mismo sexo son legales. Algunos obispos han citado esa estipulación al permitirle al clero que oficie en los matrimonios o uniones civiles de parejas del mismo sexo en estados donde esas uniones son legales.La segunda resolución le pide a la Convención que cree un equipo de trabajo que orientaría a la Iglesia a “identificar y explorar las dimensiones bíblicas, teológicas, históricas, litúrgicas y canónicas del matrimonio”, durante el trienio 2013-2015. Este equipo de trabajo, dijo Meyers en el comunicado de prensa, ayudará a que la Iglesia estudie los problemas del debate de la igualdad del matrimonio en la sociedad civil.Meyers le comentó a ENS que la decisión de dar a conocer pasajes del informe ahora se basaba en la oportunidad de una serie de reuniones a través de la Iglesia en las cuales los obispos y los diputados tendrán la oportunidad de echarle un primer vistazo al informe final. Los miembros de la SCLM presentarán el informe en reuniones regularmente programadas de sínodos provinciales antes de la Convención, las cuales comenzaron con la reunión de la IX Provincia el 7 de marzo, durante la cual se le informó a los participantes sobre los materiales.La Cámara de Obispos también recibirá un breve informe durante su reunión del 16 al 20 de marzo en el Centro de Conferencias y Retiro de Camp Allen, en Navasota, Texas. Dado el mandato de la C056, los obispos “han sido parte de este conversación todo el tiempo y se muestran muy interesados en ver este material”, señaló Meyers.“Y, al mismo tiempo, debido a nuestra política bicameral… parece importante que los diputados también tengan acceso [a esos materiales] para que puedan participar también en el debate”, añadió Meyers.Los miembros de la Cámara de Diputados podrán discutir los fragmentos en el foro de Internet en la página web de la presidenta de la Cámara de Diputados Bonnie Anderson, decía el comunicado.“Dado el número de personas que va a tener acceso [a los fragmentos] entre obispos y diputados, pareció mucho más sencillo publicarlos, de manera que otras personas de la Iglesia que quisieran seguir la discusión en el foro de los diputados, pudieran hacerlo y tener acceso al material para entender en qué consiste el debate”, explicó Meyers. Las personas que no son diputados pueden leer los textos en el foro de Internet de los diputados, pero no pueden participar en el debate.Ella agrego que esperaba que los obispos y los diputados conversarían entre sí acerca de los materiales y que encontrarían también modos de oír a los episcopales en sus diócesis.“Espero que la gente sí se tome el tiempo como dice esa antigua colecta anglicana refiriéndose a la Escritura de ‘leer, considerar, aprender e interiormente asimilar’ [propio 28] -al menos de leer y considerar, y realmente lidiar con lo que se trata, porque hay un ensayo teológico substancial en esto”, dijo ella a ENS. “También esperaría que otros episcopales  también leyeran y estudiaran este material y dialogaran al respecto con sus diputados y sus obispos, y les hicieran saber sus esperanzas  y sus preocupaciones, y que los cuestionaran, de manera que los obispos y los diputados puedan venir a la Convención y oírse mutuamente otra vez, escuchar el testimonio de las vistas públicas y estar preparados para tomar una decisión”.Sobre todo, Meyers agregó que esperaba que la Iglesia “emprendería esto con profundidad de oración y reflexión para estar atenta a la obra del Espíritu en medio nuestro”.La Comisión dijo en el prefacio a su informe que “para algunos episcopales, este material concordará  bien con su experiencia y su reflexión teológica de larga data; para otros, el llamado de la Convención General 2009 representa una ocasión nueva y tal vez desconcertante en la vida de nuestra iglesia.“Tomamos esa diferencia seriamente,” dice la Comisión, y añade que “todos nosotros pertenecemos igualmente a la Iglesia Episcopal y a la Comunión Anglicana en todo el mundo, y, la mayoría de nosotros, al Cuerpo universal de Cristo. Este material teológico respeta la centralidad de la Escritura entre los anglicanos, interpretada en concierto con las tradiciones históricas de la Iglesia y a la luz de la razón”.Un resumen del proceso que la SCLM utilizó para crear el rito y los materiales que lo acompañan se encuentra aquí en un informe de ENS de octubre de 2011, cuando la Comisión le dio los toques finales a su obra.La serie completa que la SCLM ha creado incluye una introducción en que se explica el proceso que se ha emprendido, una encuesta sobre asuntos legales y canónicos, materiales pastorales para preparar a una pareja para una bendición litúrgica, una guía de debate para congregaciones y una perspectiva general de la legislación de la CG. Estos materiales, junto con los fragmentos aparecidos el 7 de marzo, se publicarán en abril como parte de la colección de informes a la Convención General de todas las comisiones, comités, agencias y juntas oficiales de la Iglesia Episcopal que se conoce como el Libro Azul. Y que aparecerá en la Internet aquí.Para más información, diríjase a la SCLM en [email protected]— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es editora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA La Comisión de Liturgia da a conocer una propuesta sobre el rito para bendecir relaciones del mismo sexo La Convención General considerará el uso experimental del rito junto con un estudio sobre el matrimonio Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

An Episcopal WebRadio interview with the Presiding Bishop

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Anglican Communion, Anglican Covenant, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori General Convention, By Cesar CardozaPosted Jul 10, 2012 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA General Convention 2012, Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Episcopal WebRadio interview with the Presiding Bishop Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Presiding Bishop Katherine Jefferts Schori engaged in a live Spanish-language interview with Episcopal Webradio. Photos/Edgard Giraldo[Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori addressed key points of the General Convention agenda July 9 in a candid Spanish-language interview with Episcopal WebRadio.The conversation began with the “next generation”; in particular the so-called next generation Latinos, part of the new face and hope of the Episcopal Church.KJS:  Yes, the hope but also the present of the Episcopal Church.Q: Bishop, let’s begin talking about the Anglican Covenant, undoubtedly a long-standing and controversial issue. Many young Episcopalians ask themselves: what does it mean for me? What does it mean for the future of our church, a “yes” or “no” vote on this issue?KJS: The Anglican Covenant is a very relevant issue for many Anglicans and Spanish-speaking Episcopalians. I believe that the Anglican Covenant is something very British, and it is something that many in the communion see as an attempt to retain or revive the Empire. In some parts of the communion — like in New Zealand, for example — the church, for the most part aborigine, doesn’t like much the idea contained in the fourth section of the covenant. In its conclusion, it sets a process to eliminate part of the communion. I believe, as many people do in the Episcopal Church and other parts of the communion, that right now we have more opportunities to establish relationships and cooperate, and this dynamic generates stronger bonds than those that the Covenant may provide.Q: Another issue of paramount importance for the youth movement and the NGLs, Next Generation Latinos, at the General Convention is the issue of same-gender blessing. A very controversial topic at many levels; on one hand we talk about amplitude, openness, tolerance, and some sectors believe that tolerance has clear-cut boundaries. How can we bridge the gap within these two positions within the Episcopal Church?KJS: The Episcopal Church, as other Anglican churches tries to embrace many points of view within the church. We believe that God gives us different gifts and points of view and when we can harmonize these differences we can receive the holy spirit — new creation within the church’s own diversity. If we were to embrace only one point of view, we cannot receive other gifts and opportunities to find God’s creative force.Q: That was, precisely one of the points you made on this past Sunday’s sermon, when you ask everyone to raise their hands – an individual gesture, yet more meaningful when done in unity.On the issue of the Hispanic voice of the Episcopal Church, case in point, this Episcopal WebRadio is a project managed by kids; these are kids doing whatever it takes to have a voice.Can they count on the support of the head of the Episcopal Church to harness that willpower that makes anything possible?KJS: “Yes we can”… “Together we can” … I believe that in general the Episcopal Church is opening its mind and in many dioceses we can find new congregations, Spanish-speaking congregations growing very rapidly, and the Anglo population is taking notice, I believe that this is a great gift for the Episcopal Church and the church is changing.Q: For these youngsters, they see it as an enrichment of the church. They enjoy – as you said – the fact that there are people with different points of view — a wonderful base for a dialogue.KJS: Certainly.Q: In regards to the growth of the Episcopal Church in “other platforms” such as Twitter, Facebook, radio — how much does the Episcopal Church embrace these new channels of communication for ministry?KJS: This is divine inspiration. Inspiration from the Holy Spirit. It is a gift that can be used for the best or the worse. This could be a blessing for all and we should treat it as such.Q: Regarding the Hispanic ministry in the Episcopal Church; it could be seen as a small part of the whole. I tend to see it as another door, another portal. The next generation Latinos are fully bilingual … the Hispanic ministry is more of a cultural nature, of heritage rather than linguistic. How do see this emerging group that feels at ease in two different worlds?KJS: The Episcopal Church in the United States has gone thru experiences like this with other immigrant groups; Germans, French, Swiss. The first generation of immigrants needs to use their mother tongue — we cannot worship in a foreign language. We need to teach [and evangelize] in a context familiar to the worshipers.Q: I know you have a very busy agenda, but I can’t leave out the issue of Latinos in the armed forces. To serve in the military puts people on a very particular situation. They have their own needs but also their families — and then we have the Latinos. A big problem that we see is veterans that upon going back to civilian life lose everything. Many end up homeless; this is very noticeable within Latino [communities]. What is the Episcopal Church doing for those who gave everything to serve?KJS: The congregations must get more involved with people in the military. My daughter is an Air Force pilot. I know that chaplains and others are very interested in their well-being and the congregations must educate themselves around this issue.— Cesar Cardoza is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Indaba Continuo hace posible ‘una conversación configurada por el evangelio’

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Por Matthew DaviesPosted Aug 1, 2012 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Indaba Continuo hace posible ‘una conversación configurada por el evangelio’ Vídeo: El canónigo Phil Groves habla acerca del proceso Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Episcopal News Service] Hacer posible el diálogo a través de la diferencia ha sido el principal objetivo del Proceso de Indaba Continuo y Escucha Mutua de la Comunión Anglicana. Pero los frutos del programa en derribar barreras y crear relaciones de amistad a través de contextos en extremos diferentes han sobrepasado  cualquier expectativa, según la opinión de Rdo. Canónigo Phil Groves, quien dijo que el principio orientador y la clave de del éxito [del programa] ha sido el situar a Cristo en el centro de las conversaciones.“Las personas se apasionan con el evangelio, y a veces eso las lleva a profundos desacuerdos”, dijo Groves, el moderador del programa, dijo al Servicio de Prensa Episcopal (ENS) en una entrevista reciente. “Pero una vez que se sitúa a Cristo en el centro de una conversación, la gente comienza a trabajar para beneficio de la totalidad, más bien que para ganar una discusión”.[ooyala code=”l1M21pNTqPLgcqD_SoOTVqW2t0J7FtcR”]Groves asistió a la 77ª. Convención General en Indianápolis y fue testigo de cómo la Iglesia Episcopal se comprometió (en la Resolución D008) a profundizar su participación con los ministerios y redes de la Comunión Anglicana y a utilizar el proceso de Indaba Continuo para alentar “conversaciones a través de las diferencias para fortalecer las relaciones en la misión de Dios”.Groves dijo que había encontrado alentadoras las deliberaciones en la Convención General. “Había un concepto claro de que la Comunión Anglicana es algo muy importante y que [hay un]… profundo deseo de estar vinculados con personas que pueden discrepar radicalmente con la dirección de la Iglesia Episcopal”.Desde su lanzamiento en 2009, El Proceso de Indaba Continuo y Escucha Mutua ha hecho posible cuatro diálogos experimentales, en cada uno de los cuales participaron tres diócesis de diferentes provincias de la Comunión Anglicana. Los participantes de cada diócesis incluían al obispo, a varios clérigos y a líderes laicos.El programa, que es en parte una continuación del Proceso de Escucha de la Comunión Anglicana, ha capacitado a los anglicanos para discutir y aprender acerca de experiencias que se dan en contextos muy ajenos al suyo propia y a enfrentarse a las diferencias respecto a temas tales como la sexualidad humana y la interpretación teológica. (Un proceso de Indaba, palabra zulú que significa una discusión con sentido, formó las bases para grupos de alrededor de 40 obispos que se reunieron diariamente durante la Conferencia de Lambeth en 2008).La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori dijo recientemente a ENS que el programa de Indaba Continuo había “brindado notables oportunidades a los episcopales y anglicanos de aprender acerca de las realidades de la vida en diferentes partes del mundo, y debido a eso se estaban transformando los corazones”.Indaba Continuo ayuda “a proporcionar la savia vital y el aliento que puede revivir y revitalizar a la Comunión para la acción y el servicio en la misión”, dijo el Rdo. Tobias Haller, diputado a la Convención General por la Diócesis de Nueva York, quien ha sido miembro del grupo de referencia de Indaba Continuo junto con representantes de África y del Reino Unido.“Cuando Jesús describió cómo habrían de ser conocidos sus discípulos, no fue por el esplendor de sus iglesias ni el número de sus feligreses, ni por la belleza de su culto ni por la nobleza de su ética, sino por el amor que ellos se mostraran unos a otros”, dijo Haller, en un comentario reciente en la página web de Indaba Continuo [en el que explica que] “Indaba Continuo es un medio de demostrar este amor, en una conversación configurada por el evangelio y en compromiso de unos con otros…”“Las relaciones son fundamentales para nuestra restauración” dijo la obispa Mary Gray-Reeves, de la Diócesis de El Camino Real, que participó junto con sus diócesis compañeras de Gloucester, en Inglaterra, y de Tanganica Occidental, en Tanzania, en uno de los programas experimentales de Indaba Continuo.“Nos congregamos en Cristo. Somos uno in Cristo. Eso es lo que nos une. No nuestras creencias particulares, no nuestra teología, no la manera en que leemos la Escritura”, dijo Gray-Reeves a ENS en febrero durante el encuentro final del programa en la Diócesis de Gloucester.Los participantes visitaron cada una de las tres diócesis, usualmente por más de una semana cada una, para experimentar la misión de la Iglesia en su contexto local y participar en una “conversación significativa” que es el meollo del concepto zulú de “indaba”.[ooyala code=”8xanRvMzqa_pphKMxLuLDckx-ySfEhg-“]Gray-Reeves dijo que la relación de compañerismo de El Camino Real-Gloucester-Tanganica Occidental había comenzado centrándose en los problemas de la sexualidad humana, pero que a partir de entonces el grupo había aprendido a aceptar  las diferencias de cada uno respecto a ese tema. “Todos nos damos cuenta de que las conversaciones más importantes son acerca de la pobreza, de las generaciones, de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio, acerca de evangelización y discipulado”, dijo ella.A principios de julio, Gray-Reeves y los obispos Michael Perham, de Gloucester, y Sadock Makaya, de Tanganica Occidental, le escribieron al arzobispo de Cantórbery, Rowan Williams, con una reflexión sobre el proceso de Indaba, en el que subrayaban la importancia del proyecto y le expresaban su esperanza de que éste habría de expandirse dentro de la Comunión Anglicana.“La experiencia de Indaba ha acelerado nuestros vínculos afectivos la profundidad de nuestra mutua franqueza, y nuestro sincero interés de los unos por los otros como individuos y como representantes de nuestras diócesis y de nuestras respectivas culturas”, escribieron los obispos.Makaya dijo a ENS que la unidad a través de la Comunión Anglicana “es muy importante porque era la oración de nuestro Señor Jesucristo… que todos debíamos ser uno. Es sólo cuando estamos unidos que podemos ser testigos del evangelio”.Para Anel Agueyo, una laica latina proveniente de San José en la Diócesis de El Camino Real, experimentar diferentes culturas a través del programa “me ha abierto los ojos al aspecto más amplio sobre qué es y en qué consiste la vida, y de quién es Dios”.Las diócesis de Nueva York, Derby en Inglaterra, y Mumbai en la Iglesia del Norte de la India también formaron uno de los programas experimentales.Para la Rda. Winnie Varghese, una sacerdote episcopal lesbiana y nativa de Texas, con raíces familiares en la Iglesia Mar Thoma de la India, el camino hacia la profundización de relaciones a través de Indaba no se vio exento de dificultades.Indaba continuo funciona siempre y cuando esté “arraigado en el estudio bíblico y en una experiencia común diaria”, dijo a ENS Varghese, rectora de la iglesia de San Marcos en el Bowery [St. Mark’s-Church-in-the-Bowery] en Nueva York. “Su valor fundamental es el tiempo compartido con personas que desean participar de la conversación. Pero significa para todos [los que participan]—particularmente personas de color, mujeres, laicos y homosexuales, bisexuales y transexuales—la decisión de soportar algunos insultos en pro de la conversación”.Durante la primera reunión en Nueva York, Varghese dijo que los participantes “dedicaron un buen tiempo en el intento de definir el porqué estábamos allí y deseando hacer las preguntas capitales, pero nerviosos de que pudiéramos provocar alguna ofensa o producir, de alguna manera, un cortocircuito en el proceso”.Hacia el fin del programa Varghese dijo que una de las mujeres de la India se le acercó para discutir el tema de la sexualidad porque percibía que no lo habían abordado adecuadamente durante las conversaciones del grupo. “Estuvimos hablando durante varias horas. Fue una buena conversación. Básicamente, ella no quería desestimarme debido a la relación que habíamos desarrollado a lo largo de las seis semanas que estuvimos juntas, y yo sentía lo mismo”, dijo Varghese. “En definitiva, todo tiene que ver con relaciones”.Las otras dos conversaciones experimentales incluyeron a Toronto (Canadá), Jamaica (Las Antillas) y Hong Kong; y la Bahía de Saldaña (África del Sur), Ho (Ghana) y Mbeere (Kenia).Ahora que el programa experimental ha concluido, Groves espera que las provincias y diócesis a través de la Comunión Anglicana asumirán el concepto y el modelo de Indaba Continuo y lo aplicarán en los contextos locales.Groves dijo que hay marcados indicios de que varias provincias —entre ellas Kenia, Hong Kong, África Occidental y la Iglesia Episcopal de Estados Unidos— “quieren llevar adelante la metodología de Indaba Continuo”.“Los episcopales que participaron en Indaba Continuo están recomendándoles a los que tienen a su alrededor que esto es algo que es muy importante para la Iglesia Episcopal”, dijo Groves. Las diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal que tienen relaciones de compañerismo a través del mundo “se sentirán inspiradas por la Diócesis de El Camino Real y esas relaciones, y comenzarán a preguntar, ‘¿cómo podemos hacer lo mismo?’”.Haller cree que Indaba Continuo “será la savia vital y el aliento de la Comunión Anglicana”. El programa está “encendiéndose e inspirando a personas en toda la Comunión”, afirmó.El Sínodo General de la Iglesia de Inglaterra, en su reunión a principios de julio, encomió el uso de Indaba Continuo para la creación de relaciones tanto en los niveles diocesanos como parroquiales.Groves dijo que el programa ha funcionado tan bien porque los participantes han utilizado principios bíblicos para entender la manera en que los cristianos deben relacionarse unos con otros. “Una vez que comienza la trayectoria uno descubre que está trabajando con cristianos muy comprometidos”, y agregó que los participantes han entendido que la clave para las relaciones es sostener “el bien de la totalidad, con Cristo como cabeza de la Iglesia”.El Rdo. Canónigo  Rev. Kenneth Kearon, secretario general de la Comunión Anglicana, dijo a ENS que se ha sentido alentado por el compromiso de las provincias anglicanas, incluida la Iglesia Episcopal, con el programa de Indaba Continuo.“En la medida en que más diócesis se han comprometido con Indaba a través de la Comunión, han querido importar, cada vez más, las lecciones aprendidas. Esto es una cosa muy positiva, y resulta prometedor que se vaya a repetir”, dijo. “Se trata de escuchar con seriedad, de un compromiso serio y de un respeto profundo de los unos por los otros. Cualquier persona o diócesis que haya experimentado eso encuentra nuevas formas de expresar el ser anglicano”.—Matthew Davies es redactor del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Continuing Episcopalians in South Carolina ‘looking to the future’

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN November 20, 2012 at 6:13 am Thanks, authors, for this excellent review of the situation in SC. We can ask ourselves why has this happened in SC and not any other diocese in the southeast? Are the churchpeople there different than those in other nearby states? Certainly not. The people in the pews are no different than those in Georgia, North Carolina or other close states. The difference is the leadership. This was a revolution from the top down. Most communicants followed their leadership and they continue to place innate trust in them. All of this goes back to the issue of inclusion and exclusion. Some two decades ago, a distinctly conservative element gained control of the diocese and steerede it on an increasingly conservative course. They monopolized the apparati of the diocese and excluded everyone else. They put the diocese at odds with TEC even before the Robinson episode. When the old bishops retired, this clique brought in Lawrence from the original breakaway diocese, San Joaquin. He became their new standard bearer in their long running and increaingly bitter fight against TEC. His favorite subject became an ongoing denunciation of TEC for its “indiscriminate inclusivity.” Meanwhile those who had been excluded within the Diocese of South Carolina had no choice but to appeal to TEC. They did and the DBB ruled that Lawrence had abandoned the communion through his very deliberate acts. The conservative ruling pact would have none of it. They played the Vietnam syndrome card and destroyed the diocese to save it. They broke away from TEC even though they knew a large minority would remain. Lawrence voiced surprise that those who had been excluded within the old diocese were not going along with him. Actually he may be even more surprised that a solid third of the old diocese is not going along with him. They are opting for inclusion. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, RB Clay says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME November 19, 2012 at 8:50 pm No,you won’t. Better no church at all than the kind the Episcopal Church is becoming. Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Jeremy Bates says: November 22, 2012 at 12:04 am “Name calling and dismissal of other human beings has no place in the church.”Agreed. There is no place in the church for homophobia or misogyny. Christopher Cleveland says: Ronald J. Caldwell says: Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. November 20, 2012 at 9:23 am One of my friends who is a “cradle Episcopalian” said to me very recently that he and his parish followed two basic realities: 1. No One listens to the House of Bishops and have not for over 20 years and 2. there is only one sin left in the Episcopal Church and that is getting mad and leaving. Satire aside I think for those of us outside looking in we see a microcosm of what is happening across the denominational spectrum in what is taken place in the Episcopal Church. The dramatic decline in membership and the closing of many parishes, the bitter and vitriolic legal battles over property which means lets face it, money and lots of it, and a ever widening divide between those who believe in an Incarnational theology and those who do not. There has been a developing rift for some time in the Episcopal and other mainline churches between Orthodoxy and a Multicultural Universalism. Again within TEC the election of a presiding bishop who denies the unique divinity of Jesus that tension began to create the fissures that led to the splintering. Issues of inclusion of gay folke and the role of women were just a convenient ground zero. In many mainline denominations the splintering continues and those who remain seem to adopt a neo-congregationalism as a “marketing strategy ” for the future. Many find a parish or congregation that fits their view of “church” and “spirituality” and it is there they put their energies.My friend was very saddened also when he read that some of his fellow Anglicans at an international gathering had refused to receive Communion from Bishop Schori but here again is a very dramatic example of the splintering mentioned above. If there is not “common faith” that is shared then how can we have communion one with another?As to the Romans who have made some very disparaging remarks about Anglican validity well I wouldn’t feel too badly about what they say about Anglican Sacraments being null and void becuase many Orthodox including many in the OCA believe Roman Orders are “dead”, Anglican and Protestant non-existent, and any others just plain anathema! Fortunately for all of us The Holy Spirit is not bound by our prejudices and narrow polities let alone our theologies!17 hours ago · Like Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Lois Trimbur says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA November 23, 2012 at 12:17 am Kevin –I think that the Book of Common Prayer and the canons pertaining to worship are not respected by enough people in our Church – therefore we are not as united. For example the National Cathedral (among many notable places of ideally Anglican worship) does not recognize that Holy Communion is received by baptized Christians, but they instead create their own canons and rubrics and their bulletin publicizes that anyone who wants to live a “deeper life” in Christ may receive. How can this Church be a church of strict laws about property but not about what is to unite us – worship. When various bishops, cathedrals, and parishes do to suit whatever their theological leanings dictate, whatever experimentation they blame on the Holy Spirit, and whatever makes the congregation giddy? How can a bishop in this Church perform a lesbian wedding in Massachucetts when this Church has not approved it? Answer: blame the Holy Spirit and make up your own canons. How can any TEC lawyers go to court in any of the five departing dioceses and explain how this church is hierarchical, united, and a Church of canon law standards when the last General Convention’s standards for marriage and receiving the Eucharist is mocked by the very leaders who want to be taken seriously? November 19, 2012 at 5:31 pm In both the Diocese of South Carolina as well as in the wider Episcopal Church, everyone knew that Lawrence was elected because he was a chum of Scofield, everyone knew that he would probably engineer his diocese away from the Episcopal Church, pretend to speak for god, all of which has to do with gender, the fear of having to abide by equality, equality of women, equality of glbt people, equality of race, these separatists want a church of, by, and for straight white men. So, bye bye bigots, we will have an easier time of full inclusion without you, in time you will have to deal with inclusion of your own relatives. Maybe we will see you then. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Kevin Adams says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians in South Carolina were “saddened” when others in the Diocese of South Carolina on Nov. 17 affirmed an earlier decision by the diocesan leadership to leave the Episcopal Church, but they said they also were “encouraged that many people, lay and clergy, are choosing to remain.”The Episcopal Forum of South Carolina also said in a statement from its president, Melinda A. Lucka, an attorney in the Charleston area, that “the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina continues in full communion with the Episcopal Church.”Two days before the Nov. 17 meeting, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori issued a pastoral letter to Episcopalians in the diocese offering prayers and support for those who wished to remain in the Episcopal Church, and noting that the diocese “continues to be a constituent part of The Episcopal Church, even if a number of its leaders have departed.”Jefferts Schori did not issue a statement after the Nov. 17 meeting.A steering committee has been formed “to guide and assist in the reorganization of the diocese,” according to a list of its members here. Bishop John Clark Buchanan, who lives in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, and Bishop Charles vonRosenberg of Daniel Island, both retired Episcopal Church bishops, are listed as advisers to the steering committee.Hillery Douglas, a Charleston businessman and senior warden of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church there, chairs the steering committee. The committee hopes “to ensure that all Episcopalians in this diocese are able to remain in the Episcopal Church,” Douglas said after the Nov. 17 meeting.Despite the votes last month and on Nov. 17, he said, “Episcopalians will continue to worship together in this diocese,” he added.Tom Tisdale, a former diocesan chancellor who has worked for the presiding bishop in the diocese in the past, agreed. “The invitation to return will always be there without condition,” he said. “But we are looking to the future.”The continuing diocese has created a website, which includes a listing of 12 parishes and congregations in which a majority of the members have said they are remaining in the Episcopal Church. There are 78 congregations in the diocese.Lawrence and the diocesan leaders loyal to him long have engaged in a series of moves to distance the diocese from the Episcopal Church, actions ultimately stemming from disagreements over human-sexuality issues and theological interpretation. Those actions came to a head after Jefferts Schori restricted Lawrence’s ministry on Oct. 17 after the church’s Disciplinary Board for Bishops had certified to her that he had abandoned the Episcopal Church “by an open renunciation of the discipline of the church.”The board cited three instances, including Lawrence’s support of diocesan convention resolutions in 2010 meant to repudiate most of the diocese’s adherence to the church’s constitution and canons, his action to amend the diocese’s corporate charter to delete all references to the church and obedience to its constitution and canons and his directions to Diocesan Chancellor Wade Logan to send a quitclaim deed to every parish in the diocese. A quitclaim deed generally transfers ownership of the property from the party issuing the deed to the recipient. The “Dennis Canon” (Canon 1.7.4) states that a parish holds its property in trust for the diocese and the Episcopal Church.On the same day the disciplinary board acted, the diocesan Standing Committee announced that the board’s action “triggered two pre-existing corporate resolutions of the diocese, which simultaneously disaffiliated the diocese from the Episcopal Church and called a special convention.”During that convention on Nov. 17, Lawrence asked for and received affirmation of his actions and those of the Standing Committee to disaffiliate the diocese.The convention passed three resolutions. The first resolution affirmed Lawrence’s actions and those of the Standing Committee, severing any relationship with the Episcopal Church. The resolution also had the convention declare Lawrence the diocese’s “rightful bishop” and “declare that as God has sent Bishop Lawrence to be our bishop, only he [God] has the authority to declare otherwise.”The second resolution amended the diocesan constitution to remove all mention of the Episcopal Church or its General Convention. This resolution technically requires a second reading and approval. The third resolution removed all references to the Episcopal Church from the diocesan canons.The first two passed on voice votes, while the third passed by vote of 96 percent in the clergy order (71 yes votes and 3 abstentions) and 90 percent in the lay order (47 yes with 5 abstentions), according to information here.Forty-two parishes attended the special convention along with 12 missions, sending a total of 170 lay delegates.During the voting on the resolutions, the Rev. Daniel Hank of Barnwell, who abstained, said that despite personal conflict with the Episcopal Church, “the unity of the church is not the work of human hands nor of human minds, but the work of the Holy Spirit accomplished through the sacraments.”“The mother church is the flesh that bore us, brought us into this world as Christians,” he said. “I have diligently searched Scriptures and prayer book and have found no ceremony where one can divorce one’s mother.”Copies of the resolutions are here.The South Carolina diocese had set its next annual convention for March 8, 2013, and the continuing diocese plans to adhere to that date. Leadership positions will be filled and other actions taken to move the reorganization along. Meanwhile, the steering committee, while not the ecclesiastical authority in the diocese, will serve as a way for South Carolina Episcopalians to communicate with the wider Episcopal Church and take other steps to allow the diocese of reorganize and function, according to a question-and-answer section on the continuing diocese’s website.The steering committee is working via several subcommittees, including a pastoral-care subcommittee for lay and clergy; a convention subcommittee to prepare for the March convention; a communications subcommittee; a clergy subcommittee to assist priests with their ongoing ministries; and an administration subcommittee to handle human-resources issues.“People have questions, but once they’ve understand what’s going on, we have seen a tremendous amount of support to continue the Episcopal diocese,” said Holly Behre, communications subcommittee chair. “Right now, we are working on our infrastructure to get an alternate voice out there for loyal Episcopalians.”The Rev. Wilmot T. Merchant II, chair of the administration subcommittee, said he intended to continue the church’s mission.“I am not prepared to leave, because you will always have family disagreement,” he said. “There has never been a time when the church was argument-free, especially when it comes to biblical interpretation. The Episcopal Church has historically stood with people on different sides of issues, and we have survived.”Bishop vonRosenberg hosted a clergy day two days before the Nov. 17 meeting. They day was open to all diocesan clergy, and about 70 met to worship together and to ask questions of the steering committee. Some of those questions concerned the nuts and bolts of the reorganization process, such as the diocesan name, property possession, the status of pledge dollars, who could consider applications by new congregations for recognition and whether the Episcopal Church supported the committee. Clergy also asked how to care pastorally for parishioners who had been given what some people deemed incorrect information about events surrounding the disaffiliation and wanted to remain Episcopalians, and how to help congregations whose members were split but wanted to worship together.The Rev. Marshall Huey, rector of Old St. Andrew’s Parish Church Charleston, said during the clergy day he appreciated that “there has been not one disparaging remark about our brothers and sisters who have chosen a different path.”“We have a growing parish and are united in our resolve to take in as much information as we can before making an informed decision,” he said. “I feel like a child watching his divorcing parents fight it out. I am hurt by it and grieved by it. It is damaging to our Christian witness.”VonRosenberg assured those at the clergy gathering that “the church will be okay and, eventually, may even thrive.”“As the Episcopal Church, we are connected to caring people and to institutions of support beyond South Carolina,” he said.The bishop urged clergy to take care of themselves in this time of confusion and stress.“The active clergy in the parishes are the ones on the front line of this confusing time,” he said. “So they are trying to be pastoral caregivers for folks who are confused themselves … Keep the fire of that first love for ministry burning. Let others remind you of why you got into all this in the first place.”How the diocese reached this pointLawrence and the diocesan leadership have been distancing themselves from the Episcopal Church for at least three years, including through the actions cited by the disciplinary board. Questions were raised about Lawrence’s intentions, however, from the time he was nominated in 2006 to become the diocese’s 14th bishop.When Lawrence first was elected bishop in September 2006, he faced numerous questions about whether he would attempt to convince Episcopalians in the diocese to leave the church. In a Nov. 6, 2006, letter to the wider church, he wrote that he would “work at least as hard at keeping the Diocese of South Carolina in the Episcopal Church as my sister and brother bishops work at keeping the Episcopal Church in covenanted relationship with the worldwide Anglican Communion.”Lawrence did not receive the required consents to his consecration in 2007 because some standing-committee consent forms were canonically improper. He subsequently was re-elected, received the consents required for all bishops-elect and was consecrated January 26, 2008.In October 2009, the diocese authorized Lawrence and the Standing Committee to begin withdrawing from churchwide bodies that assent to “actions deemed contrary to Holy Scripture, the doctrine, discipline and worship of Christ as this church has received them, the resolutions of the Lambeth Conference which have expressed the mind of the communion, the Book of Common Prayer and our constitution and canons, until such bodies show a willingness to repent of such actions.”That authorization came in response to two 2009 General Convention resolutions passed two months earlier that focused on human sexuality and reaffirmed the Episcopal Church’s commitment to the Anglican Communion. Resolution D025 affirmed “that God has called and may call” gay and lesbian people “to any ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church.” Resolution C056 called for collecting and developing theological resources for blessing same-gender relationships and allows bishops to provide “a generous pastoral response to meet the needs of members of this church.”A diocesan news report at the time said, “These resolutions seek to protect the diocese from any attempt at unconstitutional intrusions in our corporate life in South Carolina and were in response to the revisions to the Title IV [disciplinary] canons of the Episcopal Church.”Lawrence and most of the diocese’s deputation left the 2012 General Convention on July 11, objecting to the passage of resolutions that they said violated the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Episcopal Church.The resolutions in question were A049, which allows for optional and provisional use of a rite to bless same-gender relationships, and D002 and D019, which affirm the full inclusion of transgender people in the life of the church (including the ordination process).However, the Very Rev. John B. Burwell, the sole South Carolina clergy deputy who remained, told Episcopal News Service in an interview after the House of Deputies’ last session on July 11 that “we are not leaving the Episcopal Church.” And Lawrence made it clear the next day, noting that “a deputation to General Convention has no authority to make such a decision.”Soon after convention, Lawrence added C029 to the list of resolutions deemed objectionable. The resolution had in its original form called for a “study of the theology underlying access to Holy Baptism and Holy Communion” and eventually was amended to state that “baptism is the ancient and normative entry point to receiving Holy Communion.” Another resolution (C040), which would have allowed unbaptized people to receive Communion, did not make it out of committee.Lawrence said that the amended C029 resolution “still moves the church further down the road toward encouraging the Communion of the unbaptized, which departs from 2,000 years of Christian practice” and “puts the undiscerning person in spiritual jeopardy.”Lawrence said the resolutions about transgender people would lead to an abandonment of norms because “gender may be entirely self-defined, self-chosen,” thus “condemning ourselves, our children and grandchildren, as well as future generations to sheer sexual anarchy.”“So long as I am bishop of this diocese I will not abandon its people to such darkness,” he promised.A summary of events surrounding the latest South Carolina actions is here in a Nov. 9 fact sheet issued by the church Office of Public Affairs.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Sarah Moïse Young is a freelance reporter based in Charleston, South Carolina. Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 John Poynter says: Submit a Job Listing Bishop Andrew Gerales Gentry says: Doug Desper says: Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Property, By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Sarah Moïse Young Posted Nov 19, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA November 20, 2012 at 9:30 am Ronald, I think the reason the pattern has not repeated in other neighboring states is because there were no orthodox leaders to follow in TEC, so most orthodox Anglicans have already left and joined ACNA. The gospel is more than the undifferentiated, sentimentality of “love” (ironically, the command to love is the height of law), but the announcement of the only Lord Jesus Christ’s work.Churches and people have the right to be wrong, and it’s a shame that so many resources have gone to the courts. TEC should have let the orthodox leave, but the orthodox should have been willing to leave empty-handed. If our assumptions are correct, we will be able to buy the empty properties back at a bargain, and if not, if grandma’s church goes off the deep end, that’s a price we must be willing to pay to try to be faithful. It’s hardly the same sacrifice our forebears made… Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET November 20, 2012 at 1:01 pm RB: There are other “orthodox” leaders and orthodox dioceses across TEC. Central Florida is an outstanding example in the southeast. In fact, there are twelve dioceses (now 11 since SC left) that are solidly conservative and can be counted on to vote consistently as such in church matters. No one could call any of them unorthodox. Why are they not bolting from TEC? It’s is because they ignore the national church as much as they can and go on their merry way. Personally I have no problem with that. I think it is a good approach. Some of the conservative bishops have declared they will not allow the rite of the blessing of same sex unions, but anyone is free to go to a nearby diocese to have the rite. That is a reasonable solution. I say more power to them. Lawrence, however, tried to get his people to believe that TEC was requiring dioceses to do this or that. His most outrageous assertion was that he would be forced to employ transgendered clergy. Untrue. So let’s not say there is no room for orthodox in TEC. This is still a religion of the big tent. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group November 21, 2012 at 1:32 pm I do find it very offensive when the people in the pews in SC are deemed to essentially be dumb and stupid sheep, and they are only taking this step because Bishop Lawrence is lying to them and leading them astray. I’ve heard this said before when other parishes and dioceses have left, and again, it is very offensive. Also throw in the angry, bigot, homophobe, “white boys, and other name calling of your choice. Good people can and do disagree about serious issues. While I believe that the property issues should be negotiated in good faith by both sides, it does not speak well for those of us still in TEC to be un-Christian in our discussions about those who have left. We should all be very sad and we need to take a look at ourselves to see what could we have done differently to have avoided this.Are we going to get to the point where (and yes, I have heard this mentioned) laity have to sign some sort of loyalty oath to even be considered for any position in the local parish? The Book of Common Prayer was intended to bring differing groups together to worship in common fashion, not to be conformity of thought and practice on whatever the General Convention votes on every three years.I am a member of the Episcopal Church, in good standing, I attend worship and pledge. My family and I volunteer at a local food bank, I have been a vestry member, senior warden, choir member, and a LEM. I also happen to be white, male, straight, orthodox, and a conservitive Republican who is a member of a church that has a female Presiding Bishop, a couple of openly gay bishops, priests that are female, and many priests that are openly gay. Please think before calling anyone names. November 19, 2012 at 9:57 pm We must be careful with name-calling. Is anyone who does not agree with me a bigot? I believe not. A liberal church should have a big-enough heart to make space for those who do not or cannot agree with them. If TEC can have room for glbt people and change doctrine for them why not make room for those who still believe what Episcopalians once did? Current actions and litigation hardly shows thee love that is a sign of being Christian. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC November 19, 2012 at 9:52 pm My heart leaps up with hope and courage when I read about Bishop Lawrence’s refusal to embrace heretical and apostate teaching that is now the doctrine of TEC. Pray tell, if they win in the courts (and South Carolina plays ball differently than other states where TEC has won) what will 12 churches do with 60 empty buildings? Even if they win in court TEC will bankrupt the church in the process. How fitting that more and more it is empty churches won by litigation that represents TEC that claims to welcome you.Sincere regrets,a gay former Episcopalian Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ronald J. Caldwell says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Joseph F Foster says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska South Carolina bill macmullin says: November 20, 2012 at 11:44 pm Mr. Poynter, your comments reveal a hateful, vindictive heart. Name calling and dismissal of other human beings has no place in the church. You betray your goal of full inclusion. Full inclusion of all like-minded people? Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Laura Ellen Truelove says: Continuing Episcopalians in South Carolina ‘looking to the future’ Decision by some to depart ‘saddens’ those they leave behind Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET November 20, 2012 at 9:20 am When I read what Ronald Caldwell wrote, I can’t help think that the exact same scenario took place earlier in the Pittsburgh Diocese when Robert Duncan became bishop. I have wondered for a decade what the root of the problem really is with this breakaway trend. The need for power and control can ride on any platform. A so called “leader” can justify any position, and people can be easily politically manouvered. Someone recently wrote how self-righteous egoism can be disguised as piety. How juvenile it is for one to say that I am on God’s side and you are not. What a waste of time and energy it is for someone to try and prove that they are right and you are wrong. And if they get into name calling and make accusations, then they are just sinking deeper into their own mire. The battle is futile because in the end, there is no winner. We all lose if we go that route. Someone convinced me a long time ago that it is more important to be happy than to be right.In changing the subject, would someone please be cognizant of the many Episcopalians who were members of the breakaway congregations and who still love TEC. Many of those faithful Episcopalians are churchless and have fallen through the cracks. Just because a congregation chooses to go Anglican doesn’t mean that we should forget about the minority within that congregation. Do you think that we would worship in the same church where people despise The Episcopal Church? Enough. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (13) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS General Convention, last_img read more

Video: Church of Sweden Archbishop Anders Wejryd

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 2, 2013 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal News Service] Archbishop Anders Wejryd of the (Lutheran) Church of Sweden speaks about his church’s journey with the Episcopal Church towards full communion and the treasures of that partnership. Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Video, Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ecumenical & Interreligious, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Video: Church of Sweden Archbishop Anders Wejryd Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL WCC Assembly 2013 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Bishop Hougland of Western Michigan elected bishop provisional of Eastern…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Elections Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ The crozier passes from the Rt. Rev. Cate Waynick to the Rt. Rev. Whayne Hougland Jr. at the Diocese of Eastern Michigan’s diocesan convention on Oct. 19, 2019. Photo: Diocese of Eastern Michigan[Diocese of Eastern Michigan] The Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Michigan elected the Rt. Rev. Whayne M. Hougland Jr. to serve as bishop provisional of the diocese during their annual convention on Oct. 19, 2019.Bishop Hougland, bishop diocesan of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Michigan, will serve both dioceses concurrently as the two bodies enter into a three- to five-year period of conversation around relationship and shared resources.In a letter to the diocese, the Standing Committee of Eastern Michigan celebrated the decision, saying, “We are excited to be building on our commitment to creative and innovative ministry by entering into this next phase of life for our two dioceses. We don’t know where this relationship will lead, but by placing our trust in the Holy Spirit and committing to the work of discernment and risk-taking, we believe we can build a church responsive to the needs of her people and flexible to the demands of 21st century mission and ministry. Let’s dance!”Bishop Hougland expressed his excitement as well, saying, “We are at the forefront of these kinds of experiments in the church and I think we are uniquely primed to take on this work with good faith, humor, and creativity. I am looking forward to living into these next 3-5 years and to seeing where the Spirit leads!”This next step for the two dioceses is the result of nearly two and a half years of conversation, kicked off by the resignation of former Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley to become bishop for pastoral development of The Episcopal Church, a position on the presiding bishop’s staff. Following a series of regional and diocesan-wide meetings, the Diocese of Eastern Michigan voted last fall to invite the Diocese of Western Michigan to consent to the nomination of their bishop, the Rt. Rev. Whayne Hougland, to serve as bishop provisional. In the spring, after a series of meetings on the western side of the state, Western Michigan’s Diocesan Council and Standing Committee voted unanimously to accept the invitation.The two dioceses share a number of ministries and resources already, including efforts in congregational development, local formation, mission work, governing bodies, and staff. Combined, the two dioceses are composed of just over 100 congregations and cooperating ministries, and over 12,000 baptized members. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Hougland of Western Michigan elected bishop provisional of Eastern Michigan Election marks beginning of conversations around relationship, resource sharing Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Oct 21, 2019 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Speaking Up: An innovative less invasive procedure for throat cancer

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Robert Hutson noticed a lump in his throat. While it wasn’t painful it wouldn’t go away.Robert Hutson, of Oviedo, noticed a lump in his throat. While it wasn’t painful, it wouldn’t go away.From Florida Hospital – ApopkaIt was during a business meeting in January 2013 that Robert Hutson, of Oviedo, noticed a lump in his throat. While it wasn’t painful, it wouldn’t go away.A healthy, active nonsmoker, Robert didn’t think much about it until a neighbor insisted he see a doctor. He made an appointment with Henry Ho, MD, otolaryngologist, at Florida Hospital.Robert learned he had throat cancer that had spread to his tonsils and his tongue. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. A TIMELY TREATMENT DEVELOPMENTAlthough Robert would need surgery, Dr. Ho was able to offer him a less invasive alternative to a conventional procedure: transoral robotic surgery.“Traditional surgery requires an open incision in the neck that may result in speech or swallowing difficulties,” he says. “Robotic surgery, done through the mouth, is minimally invasive. It’s been shown to improve long-term swallowing function while speeding up the recovery time.”Robert underwent surgery that March and didn’t require radiation, chemotherapy or speech therapy after a portion of his tongue was removed. Then in November, during a regular follow-up visit, Dr. Ho noticed an abnormality near the surgery site.“Dr. Ho set up a CT scan right away because he was concerned,” Robert says. “Sure enough, the cancer had returned.”Henry Nai-Hsin Ho, MD Again, Robert underwent robotic surgery, and because the cancer had reappeared so quickly, he also underwent radiation and chemotherapy. Dr. Ho doesn’t foresee him needing additional treatment.A SURPRISING CANCER SOURCERobert learned his cancer was caused by HPV, the human papillomavirus. Most women know strains of HPV can cause cervical cancer, but there are also strains that can lead to cancer of the middle throat.Robert’s case highlights the growing trend of HPV caused head and neck cancers. (More commonly, the cancers have been associated with tobacco use.) Dr. Ho says the number of men in their 50s, like Robert, with HPV-related cancers in their throat and tonsils, is increasing. It’s estimated by 2020, HPV will cause more oral than cervical cancer in the US.The good news, says Dr. Ho, is that 90 percent of HPV throat cancers are curable.SHARING THE KNOWLEDGERobert now makes an effort to educate his community about preventing HPV. “I had no idea men could develop cancer from HPV, so I tell my friends they should talk with their sons as well as their daughters about HPV,” says Robert. “This is preventable.”SEE THE WARNING SIGNSMost head and neck cancers begin in the squamous cells that line the surfaces inside the head and neck. Typical symptoms include a lump or sore (for example, in the mouth) that does not heal, a sore throat that does not go away, difficulty swallowing and hoarseness or other changes in the voice.– For the complete article and for a video on the subject, go here.center_img Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSFlorida Hospital – ApopkaThroat Cancer Previous articleReinvent your New Year’s resolution: Include your petNext articleApopka Lake Jewel Festival: Val Demings to Introduce Judge Grimes Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more