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Month: October 2020


Math on climate change was wrong

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRegarding R. Anderson’s Feb. 18 letter on climate change: His math says 2017’s undisputed 2ppm CO2 increase converts to 400 gigatons (Gt) of human CO2 emissions. He claims that humans emit closer to 8 gigatons, nowhere near 400, proving his argument against anthropogenic climate change. But as our sixth-grade math teachers told us, show your work.Mr. Anderson didn’t. University of Washington professor L. Jaegle does the math in his ATM S 211 class, available online. Given a weight of 44 for CO2 and an “80 percent N2-28 / 20 percent O2-32” atmosphere weighing five million gigatons, here we go: (2/1,000,000) x (44/(0.8×28+0.2×32)) x 5,000,000 = 15.3 Gt CO2. A two ppm CO2 rise is equivalent to 15.3 Gt, not 400 Gt, as claimed by Mr. Anderson.What of his claim that National Geographic accounts for just eight gigatons per year of CO2 fossil fuel emissions in 2007? He didn’t read the y-axis label on the magazine’s chart, which is for Carbon-12, not CO2-44, as he claimed. Eight Gt/yr of C-12 in the chart converts to 8 x (44/12) = 29.3 Gt/yr of CO2 in 2007.And sadly, we humans in 2017 emitted 36 gigatons of CO2, an astounding increase of 23 percent since 2007. (Search “global greenhouse gas emissions EPA”).What does the correct math tell us? Last year, atmospheric CO2 increased by 15.3 gigatons, and humans emitted more than twice that – 36 gigatons. Mr. Anderson’s numbers are wrong, and wrong math/science is a big problem nowadays.Rather than throwing in the towel and adding stilts to our foundations, as Mr. Anderson suggests, let’s reduce, reuse, recycle — and show our math.Guy SpiersNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:Niskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

C&W picks Swindon for Euro internet base

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Maidenhead offices: Maidenhead held high

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Government move hits cuts in rateable values

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Biggest-ever lot is sold at JLL auction

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Tesco shuts up shop on Oxford Street

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Dorrington buys £31m portfolio

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Coronavirus deals ‘powerful blow’ to Putin’s grand plans

first_imgThe bombastic military parade through Moscow’s Red Square on Saturday was slated to be the spectacle of the year on the Kremlin’s calendar.Standing with Chinese leader Xi Jinping and French President Emmanuel Macron, President Vladimir Putin would have overseen a 90-minute procession of Russia’s military might, showcasing 15,000 troops and the latest hardware.But that was before the coronavirus pandemic. ‘Distant from the people’ He said Russians were not prepared for this dual shock, noting that 60 percent do not have savings and that real incomes have fallen 7.5 percent over the last year.Russia can weather the storm for around 18 months, he said, thanks to reserves in its sovereign wealth fund of some $150 billion.But if the crisis persists and “life does not become easier, this will affect the attitude of the people to the authorities,” Nikolayev told AFP.Putin could well bounce back. He has weathered many crises over 20 years in power and is credited by many Russians for bringing the country out of the chaos of the 1990s and restoring its global prestige.Officials have said both the parade and the constitutional vote will be held later in 2020, though analyst Andrei Kolesnikov said that alone may not be enough to salvage Putin’s year.Putin “enjoyed Russians’ approval for many years,” said Kolesnikov, of the Carnegie Moscow Centre. “Now he will personally accumulate all their disapproval.””In the context of the coronavirus crisis, the vote will not mobilize the nation,” he said, and the military parade alone “will not seriously help support Putin’s falling ratings.”Stanovaya said that after so many years in power Putin has “distanced himself from the people” and lost the ability to empathize with Russians.If the Kremlin cannot address economic problems, “social irritation will grow, there will be protests,” she warned. “This is the first time in 20 years that Putin is facing a crisis this serious,” said political analyst Tatiana Stanovaya. “This is a new experience for him.”The timing of the pandemic, hitting just as Putin was unveiling major constitutional reforms, amounts to “a powerful blow to his plans”, she told AFP. Now, military jets will roar over an eerily quiet Moscow, spurting red, white and blue smoke to mark 75 years since the defeat of Nazi Germany. Putin will lay flowers at a war memorial near an abandoned Red Square and address a nation growing angry with his handling of the country.The parade is not the only victim of the coronavirus pandemic, which has crippled Russia’s economy, hospitalized the prime minister and slashed Putin’s approval ratings.Russians had been due last month to cast their votes on constitutional reforms that would have paved the way for Putin to stay in power until 2036, but those plans too were scuppered by the virus.What was supposed to be a triumphant spring for Putin has become a political letdown, observers say, one that could be difficult for the president to recover from.center_img Approval at historic low After initially reporting fewer cases than in western Europe, Russia has witnessed a grim and steady rise in new coronavirus infections in recent days.Health officials registered another record increase on Thursday and the country now ranks fifth in the world in overall infections.Russia’s death rate is low compared to the European countries hardest hit, but some observers say that discrepancy is due to how the death count is calculated.Putin this week praised the government’s response, saying that by implementing mass testing and keeping fatalities low, Russia had become a model for other countries.”What we did was absolutely right,” he said. “Many foreign countries followed our path.”Yet many Russians appear to disagree. Unlike other world leaders battling the pandemic, Putin’s approval ratings have not rallied in light of the crisis.According to independent pollster Levada, they fell to a historic low of 59 percent last month from 63 percent in March.Already strained by Western sanctions, Russia’s economy is under serious threat from the pandemic, which analysts say could deepen resentment towards the Kremlin.Since Russia imposed a lockdown to slow the spread of the virus, small businesses have struggled to survive and millions of Russians have been left without wages, despite promises from the government to support companies and employees.Igor Nikolayev, director of the Institute for Strategic Analysis at FBK Grant Thornton, said the timing of the crisis was unfortunate as it coincided with a steep fall in the price of oil, a key export which balances the Russian budget. Topics :last_img read more

Coal miner Adaro’s profit falls 17 percent in Q1 as coal prices slump

first_img“Our performance in this year’s first quarter reflects the operational excellence of our core coal assets as we recorded solid production volume amid the difficult market condition,” Adaro president director Garibaldi Thohir in a statement on Friday. “In this challenging time for the global economy and the coal market, we continue to improve our efficiency, ensure discipline in spending and maintain a solid balance sheet.”Adaro’s revenue fell, as its higher sales volume was offset by falling prices. The company’s yearly sales volume rose by 8 percent to 14.39 million tons. The price of coal fell by a sharper 27.3 percent yoy to $66.6 per ton in the Jan-March period, based on Indonesia’s coal benchmark prices (HBA).The company’s costs also declined by 5 percent to $552 million amid reduced mining activity and fuel consumption as Adaro implemented cost control measures.Read also: Indonesia’s coal giant ventures deeper into renewable energyThe global demand for coal collapsed earlier this year as businesses and industries around Asia – the world’s largest coal market – suspended their businesses at the behest of their respective governments following the COVID-19 outbreak.Adaro, like other Indonesian coal miners, faces export risks over India’s recently extended lockdown. The South Asian country is Indonesia’s second-largest coal buyer behind China.The company, which is traded on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) under the stock symbol ADRO, fell 2.12 percent on Friday. The benchmark Jakarta Composite Index (JCI) fell 0.14 percent.Topics : Coal miner PT Adaro Energi’s profit shrank by 17.36 percent year-on-year (yoy) to US$98.17 million in the first quarter amid falling coal prices and slumping demand in the coronavirus-ridden Asian economy.The publicly listed coal miner, which was the most profitable company of its kind last year, booked an 11 percent yoy sales decline to $750 million in the first quarter, according to Adaro’s latest financial report released on Friday.Read also: Indonesia’s largest power plant on schedule to operate next yearlast_img read more

Woods-Manning prevail in star-studded match, raised $20m for charity

first_imgTiger Woods says while his surgically repaired back may never be 10-out-of-10 again, it won’t stop him from being healthy and ready to go when the PGA Tour starts up again.The 44-year-old Woods says he’s been able to use the down time during the coronavirus pandemic to get himself in shape for an expected condensed fall golf season. “It is going to be interesting,” said Woods during a four-man charity golf tournament in Florida on Sunday. “I am used to trying to peak for majors in April, May, June and July, forever. Now this (COVID-19) has changed everything. It is fluid. It is on the fly.”  Asked to rate how his back feels on a scale of one to 10, Woods said, “Well, let’s just say 10 is not what it used to be.” PGA stars Woods and Phil Mickelson and two NFL quarterback legends Peyton Manning and Tom Brady squared off in an entertaining made-for-television charity golf event on Sunday that raised $20 million for coronavirus relief efforts.The 18-hole match included nine holes of four-ball and nine holes of modified alternate shot, with on-course challenges for charitable funds. Woods, who paired with Manning, showed no rust as they held off a back-nine rally from Mickelson and Brady for a one-up victory in the 18-hole match play format. Sunday’s event, called “The Match: Champions for Charity,”  was a rematch of sorts for Mickelson and Woods, who faced off in a similar charity event last year in Las Vegas. It also marked a return to the golf course for the both PGA stars due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The PGA Tour is on hiatus until June 11, when the Charles Schwab Challenge at Colonial is scheduled to begin in Texas.The charity match was the first competitive golf for Woods since the Genesis Invitational on February 16, where he shot weekend rounds of 76-77 to finish in 68th place at the Riviera Country Club course. He said the forced break has been refreshing and described his health as surprisingly good considering he has been taken out of his regular training regime. “It is to nice be at home training each and every day,” Woods said. “I get some treatment on it and get onto a routine basically. “With this pandemic and everything that has happened, we (have) all been very careful and try to stay at home,” he said.Woods says he has enjoyed spending more time with his family and has added tennis to his workouts. “It has been good in that regard because I have been able to spend a lot of time with my kids. We had a lot of fun. This is the most amount of tennis I have played ever.” The start of Sunday’s match was delayed by rain that fell steadily throughout the majority of the round.Woods helped offset the difficult playing conditions Sunday by taking advantage of competing on his home course, the Medalist Golf Club in Hobe Sound. “I am just trying to hit it in the right spots. I kind of know this place,” he told a television interviewer early in his round.The entertaining match featured plenty of friendly banter and trash talking going back and forth between four of North America’s biggest sport stars.Brady, who recently signed with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers after winning six Super Bowl titles with the New England Patriots, made the shot of the day on the par-five seventh.Wardrobe malfunction Brady had been struggling for much of the first round, but his approach on No. 7 landed just past the hole before spinning wildly to the right and rolling into the centre of the cup.”When the going gets tough, the tough get going,” an obviously relieved Brady said of his first good shot of the day.The shot was notable for another reason: it included a wardrobe malfunction. Brady also split his pants on the shot, resulting in a hasty costume change.Pants wanted in on social distancing I guess… https://t.co/PJBPyFWowI— Tom Brady (@TomBrady) May 25, 2020″There was so much torque on that swing,” he joked.The birdie also lightened the wallet of PGA golfer Brooks Koepka. When he saw Brady struggling early in the round, Koepka tweeted out a promise to donate $100,000 to charity if Brady could make a par on the front nine.”Brooks owes me a little money,” Brady said following his surprise birdie.Topics :last_img read more